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 INTERVIEW 

Rainbow Rowell

El Templo #45 (abril 2015) por Marta Álvarez


You started to write Fangirl while participating in the worldwide writing challenge NaNoWriMo back in 2011. How was the experience? Was the novel (writing style, plot...) influenced by its singular origin?

I wasn’t sure when I started that the NaNoWriMo model — writing a novel or 50,000 words in the month of November — would work for me. I thought it would be too chaotic and too fast.

But writing every day and writing so intensely helped me immerse myself in the story and get to know the characters much more quickly than usual. I just met the 50,000-word goal.

Fangirl is more than 100,000 words long, and there were at least two distinct drafts — so I definitely kept working for months after NaNoWriMo was over. But the heart of the book was written that November.

Some writers don't like fanfiction based on their stories. They don't like someone else "taking over" their work and leading their characters through paths they had not planned. Have you ever read fanfiction based on your stories? If so, what is the oddest thing you have come across?

I’m happy that people are writing fanfiction about my characters! It’s incredible to know that people are connecting to my books — and connecting in a way that’s inspiring them to make their own art and tell their own stories.

I don’t read the fanfiction because I’m not quite done with my characters, and I want to keep my headcanon straight. But I love to look at fan art. You can check out some of the fan art for my books here -- https://www.pinterest.com/rainbowrowell/

Both Fangirl and Eleanor and Park have protagonists who are a little different (physically and psychologically speaking) to those usually found in young adult literature nowadays. Do you consider this diversity of models important for the young people of our time?

 

I do think it’s important. I think that it’s good for readers – young readers, especially – to see that different kinds of people get to be heroes. That you don’t have to look a certain way or behave a certain way to fall in love or have adventures.

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